Baby time

For a few weeks, the waters of Utterslev Mose have been teeming with younglings. The first to arrive were the Greylag goslings (Anser anser), followed by the Mallard ducklings (Anas platyrhynchos).

Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos)

Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos)

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Utterslev Mose in winter

I’ve talked about Utterslev Mose for some time now, so I guess you must be quite familiar with the place. Because it’s situated next to my apartment, I often go there to enjoy the sunset when I’m not in a traveling mood. While the birds there are usually not extravagant, you can get good sights of some common species, especially when they are fed by humans.

Common coot (Fulica atra)

Eurasian coot (Fulica atra)

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Stand Still, Stay Silent

The other day, I was walking in Utterslev Mose when I saw a heron fly down a canal, in the direction of the main path. When I got there, on the small bridge, I couldn’t find it! I hadn’t seen it fly away, so I was a bit surprised, but that was nothing compared to the moment when I realized it had in fact landed a mere three meters from the bridge; I was looking for it much farther! So here I was, standing on a bridge, basically on a bike lane, with a young heron hunting near the bank a few meters away. Fortunately, few people were in the vicinity, so the bird was far from frightened, and I was not at a too high risk of being trampled by a careless biker.

Grey heron (Ardea cinerea)

Grey heron (Ardea cinerea)

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Utterslev Mose

Utterslev Mose is a recreation area on the outskirts of Copenhagen: three lakes, extensive reedbeds and grass fields around them make up an interesting area for birds, and therefore for birdwatchers too. Conveniently, I live next to this attractive place, so whenever I see a ray of sun hitting my window, I have the possibility to go out and see some wildlife. I haven’t seen anything really outstanding so far, but I still got nice sightings of a Northern goshawk (Accipiter gentilis) for instance, or of a harrier gliding over fields of gold. And while I find water birds very shy, with patience opportunities for good pictures arise. Actually, you either need patience or some people giving bread to the birds…

You can read more about the area on DOF’s website, but I have included a map of my own creation. You can’t easily reach the shores of the lakes, except where a platform is built. I indicated them in red. The stars shows a point where birds are regularly fed; there, you can bike within 30cm of a Moorhen (Gallinula chloropus)… which is usually quite a cautious bird.

I like the path north of the middle lake, because is a quiet woody area, with a lot of small birds like Green siskin (Carduelis spinus) and Long-tailed tit (Aegithalos caudatus). One day, an injured Wood warbler (Phylloscopus sibilatrix) stayed for minutes in a tree right above us, enabling us to admire its splendid yellow chest. That was the highlight of a rainy migrant-less day.

The blue spot on the map is my favourite place for bird pictures at sunset, and where some people were feeding gulls and ducks two weeks ago. Many pictures below were taken this day.

Greylag goose (Anser anser)

Greylag goose (Anser anser)

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